Sydney Party supplies

Do you love balloons?

Check out these ones: 5ea99ad0c8837b0787ca4e81f5ef5660--animal-balloons-balloon-animals

Or perhaps this type:images-14

Or do you prefer these?images-15

Whichever ones you choose, you’ll know your party will be a hit.

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They are colourful, they can be made into different shapes and they can come in all different sizes.

But now we need to change our tune.

Balloons are made of plastic that takes thousands of years to break down and many of these balloons end up in the ocean and then in the stomachs of sea life – eventually killing them.

We can live without balloons – we just need to know that they are replaceable and the replacements are just as good.

What do you think we can use instead of balloons?

Thanks for the inspiration – Humane Education

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Hush

We have read Possum Magic by Mem Fox many many times but at the moment it is taking on a little bit more meaning.


We have a resident possum and her baby living in our cubby house. Even though this may sound cute, the reasons they are there are heartbreaking.

– The mother has huge gashes on her body either from a fellow possum fighting for a tree or from a cat – and there are way too many cats who roam our neighbourhood at night.

– They have not been able to find a new tree due to the many trees that have been cut down in our area due to recent development.

– Our chickens are not very welcoming pets and they did not like the possum and her baby living in their coop.

We tried to build a possum box but she just didn’t move to it. We placed it at the right height, put fruit, old fur and poo in it but she just found the pretend oven in the cubby house more inviting.

We hope that her mother has some invisibility tips for young hush as I am just not sure how well they will go with so many cats around.

Australia – we need to take more ownership of these so called pets. If you have a cat please lock it up at night, place a bell and collar around it’s neck (even if it is chipped) and provide stimulation for it at home. Check out the PETA website – they are against cruelty to animals and even they suggest keeping your cat indoors – that says a lot to me.

I’m drafting up several letters to send to councillors and I am going to be pushing this issue. If they can rid the national park near us of foxes, surely they can bring in tougher laws for cats.

Think about Hush.

Fluke by Lesley Gibbes and Michelle Dawson

The little southern right whale was born under the shadow of the great harbour bridge.


Fluke by Lesley Gibbs and Michelle Dawson is a beautifully told story about the day a southern right whale gave birth to a calf in Sydney Harbour. Lesley Gibbs gentle storytelling skills alongside Michelle Dawson’s mesmerising illustrations make for a loving tale about a mother whale in search for her baby deep in the harbour.

This event was only the third one recorded in the last 200 years so it made a great impact on the locals who were able to watch the baby grow, become lost and then reunite with it’s mother.

Not only do we get to read this lovingly told tale, we are also able to learn more about Southern Right Whales through small facts on the front and back covers.

The story of Fluke brings to light the care that so many of us have towards living creatures when we see them in distress. It shows just how much many of us love the living world around us and marvel at the wonders it gives us everyday.

So how can we link this to sustainability? 

  • Learn more about whales – where they live, what they eat, how they move and any historical facts about human contact.
  • Are whales endangered? There are many different whales – are all of them endangered and are they all endangered by the same things?
  • How does our water usage effect these great mammals? Can you use water in a more sensible way so that it is not effecting the whales?
  • Do you know of any other stories about animal conservation that have been created into picture books? There are a few on my blog — Can you create your own?

 Phasmid

 Rhino in the House

 The hairy nosed wombats find a new home

The little Corroboree Frog

Circle

Feathers

  • Is climate change or global warming effecting these mammals?
  • How can you make sure you are making less of an impact on how whales live?

Try this:

 Use less chemicals in the shower (Check the ingredients on your bottles)

 Use less throw away plastic  – it can end up in the oceans.

Walk instead of driving

Use less heating or cooling when you can add a jumper or open up some windows instead.

Eat at home or in a restaurant instead of getting take-away.

Make your own food instead of buying food in excess packaging.

Check out some great Biome products here

The coffee cup

A few weeks ago I blogged about and sometimes you forget – which many readers found solace in considering many of us lead busy lives and just sometimes those coffee cups get forgotten.

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Well there seems to be an answer to this forgetting right here in Sydney.

Although it’s still not ideal and waste is still created – a 96% recyclable cup has been created. The first place to trial this cup will be Toby’s Estate in Chippendale. This cup can  be turned into paperback covers and other paper and cardboard products BUT it does need to be dropped into a recycle me box in order for this to happen properly.

It would be wonderful if we always remembered our reusable cup or took the time to have our tea and coffee at the cafe – but it is good to know there is an environmentally answer to those times we do forget.

Perhaps it is time to talk to your regular cafe and ask them what they are doing to make a difference to the waste their customers create. Either offer a discount or start to invest in these recyclable cups.

Dangar Island. Birds, Barrows, a ferry and me written by Joanne Karcz and illustrated by Jacqui Selby.

Can you imagine living in a place where there are no cars, a cave with hidden secrets and wheelbarrows waiting to be used by weary home comers?

Perhaps a visit to Dangar Island is on the cards for you! And if you can’t get there you need to read this delightful picture book – Dangar Island. Birds, Barrows, a ferry and me. (and perhaps after reading you will be inspired to visit the island!)

Joanne Karcz adores her home – Dangar Island – and has written a whimsical story about the life the children of Dangar Island lead from catching the ferry to school, pushing wheelbarrows home full of groceries and getting muddy on the beach searching for crabs.

Joanne has cleverly used rhyme and rhythm throughout the story which really helps to ignite imagination in readers. The illustrations by Jacqui Selby have been done in watercolour and gently complement the story. The colours and lightness of the illustrations give the story a light and happy feel as we move through the day of a Dangar Island child.

The life Joanne describes seems idyllic for any young child. Imagine being able to explore an island, free of cars and full of nature? Imagine walking out towards the edge of the island and seeing the occasional turtle, dolphin or jellyfish float by?

Perhaps these children find fishing a little boring but as they have so much freedom they must have an abundance of energy, creativity and imagination.

Dangar Island, Birds, Barrows, a ferry and me is a must read for any sydney sider and I hope that it will inspire not only a day trip to this magical island but also encouragement of more outdoor play time for your young reader.

So what can you do at home? 

Playing outside with sticks, caves, dirt and rocks is so important to all children. Get outside more often with your child. Whether it be at the park, oval, beach, river or bushland. We all need to get outside more and play!

Take a trip to Dangar Island – encourage your child to plan the day. How will you get there? Drive to the ferry stop or catch a train to Brooklyn? This is a great opportunity to teach children about timetables.

Look at the map in the picture book and compare to maps online of Dangar Island. Plan your day on the island and see what you can do!

Encourage some geography skills – How far is Dangar Island from Sydney? How large is Dangar Island. What is the river called and where does it flow to and from?

Encourage some history skills – Did Indigenous Australians live on Dangar Island? When did white men inhabit the island?

Check out the Dangar Island website: http://www.dangarislandleague.net

A bag and a bird by Pamela Allen

The plastic bag went too. John could see it caught on a bird high in the sky, flying and flapping behind like a scarf in the wind.

A warm sunny day, a long walk outside in the fresh air and a myriad of discoveries – a beautiful way to start the weekend but there is a lot more than just a walk from Kirribilli to the Royal botanic Gardens in store!

A mother and her son decide to make the most of a sunny day by packing lunch and taking off on a stroll by the harbour. They pack lunch in a plastic bag – possibly not realising the ramifications this item has on the environment in so many different ways. `

Exploring Sydney by foot is a wonderful way to see the different aspects of the city away from the cars and the busy-ness; and this book shows the reader how easy and how lovely the harbour and botanic gardens area is.

A bag and a bird by Pamela Allen not only explores the fun you can have on foot but also the importance of looking after everything that is on this planet – even those pesky birds that scramble after any crumb you might drop on the ground. (I’m sure you or someone you know has had a biscuit snatched right out of their hands by a hungry winged creature!)

As humans we have created so much damage so we can live comfortably, not considering how every little thing we do makes a huge impact on other people, animals and plants.

A bag and a bird is a lovely book to start a conversation about plastic bags and how important community spirit is to making a difference in the way we live. It is amazing how the actions of one person can change the minds of so many.

So what can you do at home?

  • Take your own bags to the supermarket and say no to using plastic. Every plastic bag will last for hundreds of years and will make a huge impact in the environment.
  • Take a walk around your local area – get outside and enjoy the sights! Draw a map of where you walked.
  • Learn about the different birds that inhabit your area. Why do they live here? Are they native or introduced?
  • Find out about different community groups that help others and are making commitments to the sustainable development goal

And – Keep reading. Keep enjoying those quiet and close moments when you can escape into another world and ponder about the world you live in too.

 Check out these great books from Biome!