The next day roast pumpkin

I love pumpkin and it’s only recently that I have realised how diverse this orange vegetable is!

Whenever we had leftover roast pumpkin in the past I would serve it again as – roast pumpkin.

But now, inspired by a need to cut down on food waste I have come across some great recipes and they are here for you to make too!

  • Bake your pumpkin seeds – use them as extra crunch on top of a salad.
  • Make some delicious pumpkin and corn fritters, taken from Simplicious Flow by Sarah Wilson.

 I Quit Sugar: Simplicious Flow by Sarah Wilson

  • Bake some sausages with your pumpkin to give them some extra flavour! Another recipe taken from Simplicious Flow by Sarah Wilson.

 I Quit Sugar: Simplicious Flow by Sarah Wilson

Pumpkin-Spice-Muffins-and-Bread-Recipe-with-Coconut-Flour (image taken from https://wellnessmama.com/3655/coconut-flour-pumpkin-bread/)

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(Image taken from https://detoxinista.com/coconut-flour-pumpkin-bars/)

No more just leftover roast pumpkin nights OR leftover pumpkin in the compost bin.

It’s much better in your belly!

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How do you wrap your sandwich

 

I’ve always been intrigued by the amount of people that tell me they can’t stop using cling wrap because they can’t afford to buy reusable containers.

So I decided to do a little research of my own and here you are – some reasons why you should ditch the cling wrap and plastic zip lock bags and move towards reusable containers, beeswax wraps and paper bags!

You can’t cite the cost when they are nearly all the same!!

How much is your sandwich wrap costing you?-3

Lunchbox musings

As a parent I am swamped with what we should be giving our children for school lunches and also the importance of how they look.

Really? Do we really need to worry about how the food in our children’s lunch boxes look? Not only is this more pressure on parents to pack the perfect, fun looking lunchbox but it is also setting up our children to expect food to look certain ways. This could lead children down the path of only eating carrots if they are sticking out of an apples with sultanas for eyes…

So what should you be trying to put in your child’s lunchbox if it is not only going to be healthy but also better for the environment?

  1.  No single use plastic. You can use sandwich containers, beeswax wraps and smaller containers to pack food in.
  2. Think you need packaged food? Try making your own cupcakes, biscuits or muesli bars  as an afternoon activity. Children learn about measuring and different ingredients through this fun – albeit messy process.
  3. Less meat – try eggs, avocado, cheese twice a week instead of meat products.
  4. Aim for more fruit and vegetables cut into manageable pieces  – these leave a better impact on the environment and have no packaging!
  5. Fill up a drink bottle instead of packing poppers or bottled water. We don’t need more waste when we have access to fresh and clean drinking water. Worried about chlorine and fluoride? Check out these products.
  6. Ask your school to minimise the amount of waste created by students by removing bins, encouraging a waste free canteen and waste free events.