CBCA Notable lesson ideas

Older readers

Lenny’s book of everything by Karen Foxlee

Tales from Inner City by Shaun Tan https://educateempower.blog/2019/03/06/tales-from-the-inner-city-by-shaun-tan/

Younger readers

Black Cockatoo by Carl Merrison

His Name was walter by Emily Rodda

Early Childhood

Collecting Sunshine by Rachel Flynn

Beware the deep Dark forest by Sue Whiting

Picture book of the year

Room on our rock by Kate and Joe Temple

Girl on Wire by Lucy Estela

The incredible freedom machines by Kirli Saunders

The all new must have orange 430 by Michael Speechley

When you’re going to the moon by Sasha Beekman

Cicada by Shaun Tan

Eve Pownell Award

Digby and Claude by Emma Allen and Hannah Somerville

The flying optometrist by Joanne Anderton and Karen Erasmus

The great lizard trek by Felicity Bradshaw and Norma MacDonald

Australian Birds by Matt Chun

Bouncing Back by Coral Tulloch and Rohan Cleave

Under the Southern Cross by Frane Lessac

Waves by Rawlins, Donna, Potter, Heather , Jackson, Mark 

Our Birds: Ŋilimurruŋgu Wäyin Malanynha by Stubbs, Siena

Sorry Day by Vass, Coralillus. Leffler, Dub


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Bouncing Back: An eastern barred bandicoot story by Rohan Cleave and Coral Tulloch

How did the last eastern barred bandicoot on the Australian mainland end up living in a rubbish tip? 

Based on a true story, Rohan Cleave and Coral Tulloch have created a picture book that teaches young readers about the plight of the Eastern Barred Bandicoot and the hard work of volunteers, conservationists and scientists to bring them back from the brink of extinction.

The story begins with some information about the Bandicoot, accompanied by delicately illustrated pictures. We learn how they live and grow, what they like to eat and their habitat.

Sadly we learn how humans have caused devastation to this once thriving population through the eyes of the Bandicoot.

The Bandicoots tell us that because of land clearing, fires, foxes and cats their numbers have drastically dwindled.

They tell us that because they have no where to hide in the once loved long grasses, they are easy prey for owls and feral animals.

The double page spread drawn by Coral Tulloch brings home the terrible circumstances these animals were in – life in a rubbish dump – the only place they felt safe enough.

Luckily a small band of dedicated people were able to save the last few of these Eastern Barred bandicoots and with hard work their population is on the rise in fenced reserves, safe from feral animals and land clearing.

This story, although long, is engaging and children will be happy to know that there is a happy ending – even if there is still a lot of work to be done.

Facts and a glossary are added to the end of the story and the endpapers are a fantastic tool for conversation!!

What else can you do with this story? 

Ask students to find out about an endangered species and create their own picture book so they can teach others about it’s plight and how people are trying to save them.

Ask students : What would life be like if Eastern Barred Bandicoot’s disappeared? How would the ecosystem be effected?

Find out: Are there other picture books that are based on factual events that look at animals brought back from near extinction? Try Phasmid: saving the Lord Howe Island Insect and Rhino in the House

And access some great teacher notes from CSIRO

Buy your own copy from Booktopia

Booktopia

Extra links for further study

Conservation volunteers: http://conservationvolunteers.com.au/what-we-do/threatened-species/eastern-barred-bandicoot/

Zoos Victoria: https://www.zoo.org.au/werribee/animals/eastern-barred-bandicoot