Sorry day by Coral Vass and Dub Leffler

Long ago and not so long ago, the children were taken away

Sorry Day is a very important picture book  to share this Sorry day – or any future Sorry days.

Released on May 1st, Sorry Day by Coral Vass and Dub Leffler is a powerful story that highlights both the impact on the families who lost loved ones when they were taken away and the impact Kevin Rudd and the Australian community had when they formally said sorry in 2008.

The scene is set as we meet young Maggie who is excitedly waiting at the Sorry Day speech but amongst the excitement she loses her mother and frantically searches for her amongst the sea of legs and people.

But as we watch Maggie we also see the loss the Indigenous people experienced during the period of The Stolen Generation, we experience through word and illustration how it would have felt to be ripped apart from your family with no warning.

Dub Leffler’s illustrations are amazing and give so much more emotion to this meaningful story. We hear the story and we see the people.

We hear their cries and we feel the emotion as we watch their faces.

We read the history and we see how this has effected the current landscape.

Sorry Day by Coral Vass and Dub Leffler is picture book you will not forget.

I’m sure children will have many questions about this topic once this story has been read as the links between a child getting lost in a crowd and the story of children being taken away really pulls at the heartstrings and stirs so much emotion.

Delve deep into this topic with your young readers, explore the past and think about how we can make the future a better place.

What else can you talk about?

  • Explore the quote: Long ago and not so long ago, the children were taken away.
  • How did the story impact your emotions?
  • Why did the author jump between the past and the present?
  • How has the illustrator shown the difference between the past and the present?

Sorry Day

  • When is Sorry Day and how long have we commemorated this day?
  • Explore the impacts of The Stolen Generation.
  • Why was there a Stolen Generation?
  • What can we do now to ensure inequalities between indigenous and non-indigenous people lessen?
  • How can you share the story of Sorry Day with others?

Creative Arts

  • List any songs that you know of that explore this theme.
  • List any artwork that you know of that explores this theme.

There are some excellent teacher notes here: https://flickingonthebook.files.wordpress.com/2018/05/3fe4b-sorrydayteachers27notes.pdf

Buy this book now from Fishpond:

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Stories for Simon by Lisa Miranda Sarzin and Illustrated by Lauren Briggs.

This story speaks of love and understanding, it speaks of a time past and a time present coming together. Stories for Simon shows us that we are all part of this big world and together we can all help healing to take place.


Stories for Simon is a truly beautiful story about healing the past and working together for a brighter future.

When a young boy named Simon receives a Boomerang in the post from his uncle little does he know that the paper that wraps the Boomerang carries a message to the Stolen generations of Australia.

Sorry

With his teacher and mother’s help he learns what saying sorry means.

But it is through an unexpected friendship that Simon really understands the meaning of saying sorry.

This is a wonderful story of friendship, understanding of different cultures and reconciliation. The illustrations add to the cultural dimension of this story – both Indigenous dreamtime and the horrifying aspects of the stolen generation. Children will love looking at the illustrations as they read Stories for Simon as they add warmth and acknowledgment to each of the characters and their role within the story.

Stories for Simon will help readers to understand why saying sorry is so important, why the healing process will take a long time and why we need to continue to work towards a better future for the Indigenous people of Australia.

All royalties from this book go towards the GO foundation (Goodes & O’Loughlin) which supports creating opportunities for Indigenous Youth through education.

So what can you do?

REFLECT

LITERACY

  • What do you think the stones meant?
  • Where do you think this famous beach is?

DEVELOPING EMPATHY

  • Create your own Sorry cloud for Reconciliation week – just like the sorry stones. What do you think we can do to make Australia a better place for everyone? 

GEOGRAPHY

  • There is a forward by Vic Simms, an elder of the Bidjigal nation. Research the different nations of Australia.

 

Books that have Indigenous links

The Legend of Moonie Jarl

Walking with the seasons in Kakadu

Colours of Australia by Bronwyn Bancroft.

Thirst

WELCOME TO COUNTRY by Aunty Joy Murphy

At the Zoo I see

Our Island

Say Yes

Mrs White and the Red Desert

Crabbing with Dad

On the way to Nana’s

Stories for Simon

Animals in my Garden by Bronwyn Houston

Mad Magpie by Gregg Dreise

Shapes of Australia by Bronwyn Bancroft 

Waterlilies by Diane Lucas

Shallow in the Deep End by the Tiwi College Alalinguwi Jarrakarlinga

Kookoo Kookaburra by Gregg Dreise

Once there was a boy by Dub Leffler

We all sleep by Ezekiel Kwaymullina and Sally Morgan

My Country by Ezekiel Kwaymullina and Sally Morgan

At the Zoo I see

Big Fella Rain

Deep Diving