Wolfie: An unlikely Hero by Deborah Abela and Connah Brecon

Those Poor wolves.

Have you ever read a story where the wolf is a hero? The wolf is the good character? Or the wolf is someone that we should all look up to?


I haven’t but perhaps there is hope that not every story with a wolf in it has terror within!

Wolfie: An unlikely Hero by Deborah Abela and Connah Brecon is a humorous tale where a wolf tries to take on the storytelling skills of the narrator…and gets more than he bargained for!

Wolfie wants to be known for his running skills, his gleaming teeth, his loyalty and his bravery and the narrator takes note….but not in the way Wolfie was hoping for.

Wolf: an unlikely hero made us laugh and it also made us feel sorry for poor Wolfie – but it also made us think that perhaps we shouldn’t trust wolves…or should we?

Wolfie: an unlikely hero allows the reader to see how stories, when changed in the slightest way, can make huge differences. This story shows the reader how wonderful storytelling is and that we can all play a big role in telling different stories.

Fairytales are great places to help children become interested in reading and Wolfie plays on all of those wolf containing stories!

How can you add more to this story?

LITERACY

Predict: What do you think will happen to this wolf? Why is he an unlikely hero? How do the other characters on the front and back cover feel about this wolf?

Visualise: Think about how the wolf wants to be seen and how the narrator sees him by using the same words.

Storytelling: How can you create a story with many different endings? What events need to happen so a story can be changed so easily?

Reflect: Think about all of the different stories with wolves in them. Group these according to the different types of personalities, things they get up to and how the story finishes for the wolf.

Stereotyping:

How are wolves portrayed in different stories? How are princesses portrayed? Pigs? Dragons?

What is stereotyping and how do we stereotype in society?

 

Fairytales:

Can you create a fairytale with a different ending?
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Families and reading

On the 15th May it is the UN’s international day of families. Families play a vital role in the education of their children. Families are the first educators of their children and it is within the family group where the love of literacy can blossom.

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Reading is a gateway to imagination, being literate and developing empathy. If you can take the time to read as a family then these skills are being embedded into your child and also reinforced within yourself. Reading as a family gives you time to be close together and to discuss things that aren’t happening in your daily lives (imagine talking about dragons, talking trees and magical stones!)  

Show your children that reading is a pleasurable activity, show them how important searching a  library for the perfect book is. There are no bad authors or books, you just need to take the time to find the books that suit you or perhaps open your mind to new ideas.

As a family take the time to visit your local library, the school library or even the online library catalogue. Borrow some loved books and books that will stretch your mind. Read together or read apart and then discuss what you have read. Reading is the key.

As Albert Einstein once said: “If you want your child to be intelligent, read them fairy tales. If you want them to be more intelligent, read them more fairytales”