Save time, save money and be eco #2 – Veggies

So you’ve been told to only eat organic, only buy from farmer’s markets and nothing wrapped in plastic – tricky? Yes!

After reading many years ago that the pesticides that are sprayed on our vegetables cause more harm than good to not only our bodies but also the environment, I was determined to eat better.

We tried organic for everything

First we tried organic. Eating certified organic food is one of the best possible ways you can avoid nasty pesticides but it is very expensive and often wrapped in unnecessary plastic to differentiate it from other vegetables.

So I found a list: https://www.onegreenplanet.org/news/dirty-dozen-fruits-and-vegetables/

And we tried to stick by this but as you are well aware time and money comes into play

So we found this – A local coop : Harvest Hub

Harvest hub has been a great find for us. It supplies Sydney suburbs with small scale farmed produce and many of it is spray free. This means they are not certified organic but still limit the amount and types of sprays they use. The fruit and vegetables are fresh – no sitting in freezers for month and we are supporting locally grown produce – no overseas food miles here.

We may spend a little bit more money but the produce lasts A LOT LONGER than supermarket food. I have had carrots fall to the bottom of the drawer and be found two weeks later still crispy and delicious! (that would never happen with the supermarket bought carrots)

So what do I recommend?

  1. Buy organic if you can but only if it is not wrapped in plastic. Local coops and farmers markets can offer affordable organic produce at times.
  2. Buy spray free if not organic. Google your local coops for this and seek farmers markets.
  3. If you cannot afford either, soak your vegetables in one tablespoon of baking soda to a bowl of water (https://foodrevolution.org/blog/how-to-wash-vegetables-fruits/) to remove pesticide residue.
  4. Buy local food and buy in season. You do not need mandarins from USA in summer if you can buy melons and berries grown in Australia.
  5. Buy fruit and vegetables that are not wrapped in plastic – does it really save you time? I highly doubt it.

What do you do to lessen your impact on the environment and your wallet when buying fruit and vegetables?

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How renewable energy works by Geoff Barker

Young children may have heard the term renewable energy or perhaps solar energy – but do they really know what it is and why we use it?

How renewable energy works is another title in the Eco Works series that enlightens readers in exciting world of ecological developments. This series examines green technology and how scientists are searching for the best way we can harness this technology to reduce our carbon footprint and create a better world than we have today.

How renewable energy works by Geoff Barker explore the different types of renewable energy that we are currently using in the world and why we use it. Through photographs and written information, children will discover how energy is harnessed through the use of the sun, the wind, water and waves. They will also learn about biomass, Biogas and geothermal technology.

Throughout the book we are told that these energies need to be harnessed and used by more people so that we can move away from our reliance on fossil fuels – and by giving children the knowledge about these other energy options, it will start to make sense to them why this is so.

Without knowledge, young people can feel that they don’t have the power to lobby for change so by giving them this information through real life images and simple explanations they can start to build their own knowledge and perhaps talk to their parents about the possibility of changing the energy sources their household uses.

How renewable energy works is a great addition to any classroom and makes great links to:

Science