Go away worry monster by Brooke Graham and Robin Tatlow-Lord. Published by EK Books

Late one night, Worry Monster climbed into Archie’s bed

We all have worries and as adults have developed tools and strategies along the way to help those worries to go away, but do all children have these tools – perhaps not?

Go away Worry Monster by Brooke Graham and Robin Tatlow-Lord is an excellent book to show children that worries will always be there but we cannot let them lead our thoughts – we need to know how to get them away so these monsters do not grow bigger than us.

Archie is worried about starting a new school and with the thought of the unknown whirring around in his head he starts to listen to the Worry Monster who blows everything out of proportion. 

The Worry Monster reinforces to him that his teacher will be mean, he will get lost and he won’t have friends and all Archie wants to do is run to his parents.  Luckily for him he remembers his facts. Through thinking about these facts he soon realises that these worries, although are important, are not as bad as what the Worry Monster is telling him.

Eventually the Worry Monster shrinks – but importantly does not disappear. I think this is a really important aspect of this picture book as we know that worries never do go away from us, they are always there. We just need to know how to control them.

Robyn Tatlow-Lord’s illustrations are full of colour within the dark night time bedroom of young Archie and represent the many feelings we know Archie is going through. The use of space gives more meaning to how Archie is feeling and acting and allows for conversations about worries as the book is being read and shared.

The Worry Monster by Brooke Graham and Robin tatlow-Lord is an excellent resource to share with young children to start discussions as to how they can act when they are worried.

Lesson links

It is a great resource for:

  • RUOK day
  • any lessons in personal development and social and emotional health.

Buy your copy today to start discussing this with your children or students in your classroom.

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